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Ashden Awards for Sustainable Energy

Ashden Awards for Sustainable Energy

The International Awards are designed for schemes in the developing world.

Award winners use local renewable energy to reduce poverty, improve people’s health, well-being and economic prospects, and at the same time tackle climate change and other environmental threats, notably deforestation.

There are five international awards in total, each with a first prize of £30,000 and a second prize of £10,000. Prizes will be awarded for schemes which address at least one of the following areas: 1). food security; 2. health and welfare; 3). light; 4). education; and 5). enterprise. One of the five awards will take the form of a special African Award, reserved specifically for an outstanding scheme from that continent.

This Award was introduced in recognition of the particular challenges which climate change and poverty play in threatening the future of Africa, and the vital contribution which local renewable energy can make in tackling both.

Past winners are the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology (Rwanda) for using biogas systems to improve sanitation and supply cooking fuel in large institutions, and the Mwanza Rural Housing Program  (Tanzania) for developing small businesses which produce high-quality bricks fired using agricultural waste. For more information and application materials, contact: Ashden Awards for Sustainable Energy.

Apply for Arts Education Grants in India

Apply for Arts Education Grants in India

India Foundation for the Arts (IFA) is currently accepting proposals for Arts Education from Government aided or non-profit schools across India for projects that seek to integrate the arts into classroom teaching and learning.

IFA’s Arts Education grant program titled Kali Kalisu (meaning ‘learn’ and ‘teach’ in Kannada), has endeavored to make the arts an integral part of learning and the joy of exploration. Over the past 10 years, it has enabled teachers in Karnataka to connect the lived experiences of their students to the syllabus in their text books through engagements with local art forms and cultural practices. While building application skills that bring about cohesive intellectual and emotional development in children, the program also hopes that the school becomes a center for learning and sharing among students, teachers, administrators and the larger community. It attempts to inspire students to become critical citizens of the country.

Schools from across the country can apply to IFA with projects that seek to develop effective and sustainable arts education models. These projects could address one or more of the following objectives: Connect local art forms and cultural practices with classroom learning and teaching; integrate arts processes into learning and teaching of all subjects; include lived experiences of the students to classroom learning; and work with local artists and resources from the community. Government aided schools or non-profit schools can apply for this grant.

The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA)

The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA)

The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) is a partnership of The Rockefeller Foundation and The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation working with African governments, other donors, NGOs, the private sector and African farmers to significantly and sustainably improve the productivity and incomes of poor, small-scale farmers in Africa.

The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa is headquartered in Nairobi, Kenya, and maintains an office in Accra, Ghana, and also undertakes policy advocacy and resource mobilization. The Program for Africa’s Seeds Systems (PASS) is an AGRA initiative to improve food security and reduce poverty in Africa by promoting the development of seed delivery systems that allow small-scale farmers to gain access to improved, adapted crop varieties in an equitable and sustainable manner.

AGRA invites proposals from duly qualified organizations for funding of a maximum of $150,000 over two years for activities which will allow the grantee to improve the production and distribution of certified seed of improved, adapted crop varieties among poor, small-scale farmers through both private and public channels, including seed companies, community-based seed systems and public research and extension services.

Proposals should include activities which increase farmer awareness of the value of improved seed and strengthen seed dissemination channels through agro-dealers and other seed retailers. Priority will be given to proposals which focus on production and delivery of large quantities of high quality seed of a wide range of crop species to poor, small-scale farmers at the lowest price. Eligible countries include: Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Malawi, Zambia, Mozambique, Ghana, Nigeria, Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso.

Arab Gulf Program for United Nations Development

Arab Gulf Program for United Nations Development

AGFUND International Prize is an annual prize awarded by the Arab Gulf Program for United Nations Development Organizations (AGFUND). It aims to honor the pioneering development projects in the developing countries and concerned with the support of sustainable human development efforts, targeting the neediest groups in the developing countries, particularly women and children. The Prize is a financial reward of $300,000 USD in addition to trophies and certificates of recognition. For further details and application forms, contact: AGFUND International Prize Website.

African Women Development Fund

African Women Development Fund

African Women Development Fund (AWDF) is an institutional capacity-building and program development fund, which aims to help build a culture of learning and partnerships within the African women’s movement.

The African Women Development Fund (AWDF) funds local, national, sub-regional and regional organizations in Africa working towards women’s empowerment. In addition to awarding grants, the AWDF attempts to strengthen the organisational capacities of its grantees. The funds work in six thematic areas: 1). Women’s Human Rights; 2). Political Participation; 3). Peace Building; 4). Health, Reproductive Rights; 5). HIV/AIDS; and 6). Economic Empowerment. Interested organizations should send in their proposals to the AWDF secretariat in Accra, Ghana, using the grant application guidelines. Please note that whilst applications will be accepted by email and fax, a hard copy is still expected.

Haiti Humanitarian Needs

Haiti Humanitarian Needs

In 2018, Haiti suffered a period of severe drought, floods and an earthquake, at a time the country is still facing epidemics of cholera, diphtheria and malaria, a migration crisis with the voluntary or forced displacement of Haitian populations from the Dominican Republic or other countries in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and recurrent protection problems.

These factors, combined with chronic poverty, the economic and social crisis, and structural deficiencies, have contributed to perpetuating a humanitarian crisis situation. Humanitarian needs assistance in 2019 concern 2.6 million people, including 1,330,000 women, 1,306,000 men, 1,227,000 children, 1,248,000 adults and 161,000 elderly people who are mainly affected by acute food insecurity. Almost half of those affected are children. Throughout Haiti, 39 municipalities in 8 departments and the border area with the Dominican Republic have been defined as priority intervention areas, in addition to the Grand Nord recently affected by an earthquake. Artibonite, Centre and Ouest regions are particularly affected by cholera and diphtheria epidemics. The HNO analysis conducted by the sectors considered the approach to the humanitarian needs of the Haitian population around the 4 major humanitarian issues provided below.

Africa: AIDS Related Mortality Remains High

Africa: AIDS Related Mortality Remains High

AIDS related mortality remains high – 770,000 deaths in 2018 – and has hardly declined in recent years. This global trend is reflected in countries where Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) works and continues to witness high ongoing mortality. To achieve the UNAIDS target of 500,000 deaths in 2020 requires a focus on and a drastic acceleration of measures to decrease mortality. For this it is necessary to plan, fund and implement a package of care to prevent, detect and treat Advanced HIV Disease (AHD) or AIDS, as outlined in the World Health Organisation’s 2017 Guidelines for managing Advanced HIV Disease and rapid initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

This report, compiled by MSF, presents data from the AHD dashboard initiated by the HIV Advanced Disease Consortium (HIV-ADC). Findings from ongoing monitoring of the current status of AHD in terms of guidelines, funding and implementation in 15 countries where MSF works are presented: the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, eSwatini, Guinea, India, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nigeria, South Africa, South Sudan, Uganda and Zimbabwe. While an increasing number of countries are addressing AHD in their national guidelines, progress has been slow, and funding as well as implementation of a package of care for AHD remains extremely limited.

Africa: Children, HIV and AIDS

Africa: Children, HIV and AIDS

Eastern and Southern Africa is the region with the biggest epidemic but the most successful HIV response to date by many measures. More than 1.3 million new HIV infections in children under five have been prevented since 2010, and more than 90 per cent of pregnant women living with HIV receive antiretrovirals. However, progress has been less substantial in other aspects of the response. Annual reductions in new HIV infections among adolescents (aged 10–19), especially girls, have not been fast enough to curb the epidemic. Critical needs include improving HIV testing, treatment and viral suppression among adolescents; reaching mothers yet unreached with services for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission; and retaining them in care and treatment throughout pregnancy and the breastfeeding period.

Deterioration of Food Security in Haiti

Deterioration of Food Security in Haiti

Port au Prince, November 21, 2019 – Humanitarian organisations in Haiti express their concern over the scale of the food crisis that has been confirmed by the publication of the results of the Integrated Framework of Classification of Food Security (IPC)* by the National Coordination of Food Security (CNSA) and the Ministry of Agriculture. Currently, 35% of the Haitian population needs emergency food assistance (3.67 million people). If no action is taken immediately, 4.10 million people will be affected by March to June 2020, or 40% of the Haitian population.

Rising commodity prices, the depreciation of the Haitian Gourde relative to the US Dollar, the ongoing drought, socio-political unrest and deteriorating security conditions have all greatly reduced access to food for the poorest households. They are forced to adopt negative survival strategies that are eroding their livelihoods.

Some areas are experiencing unprecedented levels of food insecurity, while humanitarian organisations and other actors are facing increasing access difficulties due to the deterioration of the security context. In the metropolitan area of Port au Prince, the proportion of the population in an emergency food crisis varies between 15 and 50%. In rural areas, the 2018 drought, which lasted until the first half of the year 2019, led to a decline in agricultural production of about 12% in many parts of the country. Rural areas in the departments of the North West, Artibonite, Nippes and Grand’Anse are among the most affected, and have the highest percentage of people in need of immediate assistance.

The absence of a major response during the next farming periods would have dramatic consequences for the food security of Haitian households. For the projected period, from March to June 2020, 12% of the population will be in a situation of food emergency (1.2 million people) and 28% in situation of food crisis (2.8) million people, representing 40% of the total population.

Based on the recommendations of the National Coordination of Food Security (CNSA), humanitarian organisations are launching an appeal to meet the identified needs in order to urgently ensure access to food for the most affected populations in the most appropriate form by prioritizing the acquisition of local products to avoid aggravating the economic crisis; and take immediate action for the prevention and care of people suffering from acute malnutrition, especially children. This immediate assistance must imperatively be accompanied by the reconstruction and development of the livelihoods of these populations, as well as the strengthening of the surveillance and early warning system for food and nutritional security in order to better anticipate future crises.

Substantial Agricultural Losses in Mozambique

Substantial Agricultural Losses in Mozambique

In Mozambique multiple and consecutive incidents, including drought, cyclones, floods and insecurity, have left an estimated 2.5 million people – almost 10 per cent of the country’s population – in need of lifesaving and resilience-building assistance. In addition, an estimated 67,500 children under the age of five are in need of treatment for acute malnutrition (6,500 children for severe acute malnutrition and 61,000 for moderate acute malnutrition). Poor performance of the January-March 2019 rainy season in southern provinces (Maputo, Gaza and Inhambane caused substantial agricultural losses, with lingering effects expected to last until the next main harvest in February 2020.

Drought affects men, women, girls and boys in different ways because their roles and responsibilities are different. Adolescent girls and women are typically more affected by drought because it is usually their job to find water and food for the family, therefore they are more likely to drop out of school to care for their younger siblings as their parents travel long distances looking for food.